Mozilla L10n – Urdu Team Meeting

This meeting was to bring together all the contributors of Urdu on a platform to discuss issues and solve problems. Also to decide the plan to create stylesheets, guidelines and active projects we will be focusing on. Following is the meeting note.

L10n Urdu Meeting : 27/10/2019 9:30 PM – 10:30 PM IST

Reps Event: https://reps.mozilla.org/e/mozilla-l10n-urdu-team-meeting/

Members Joined:

With this I would like to thank our newest contributor to Urdu, Mahtab Alam, he has been in L10n space for a long time, but recently started contributing to Urdu.

 

 

Common Voice Ranchi Sprint

Common Voice is a project to help make voice recognition open to everyone. To create voice systems, developers need an extremely large amount of voice data. Most of the data used by large companies aren’t available to the majority of people. We think that stifles innovation. So we’ve launched Common Voice, a project to help make voice recognition open and accessible to everyone! Raise your voice and get involved!

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Screenshot_2019-09-05 Common Voice by Mozilla.png

We in Ranchi decided to host a series of events to achieve a certain goal for Common Voice.

The goal of this series was to achieve 6000 Clips of Audio Spoken from each participant, and tell you upfront, we did!

We kept the event on each Friday with limited participants:

  • Wasaf: 790
  • Kashif: 935
  • Barkatullah: 700
  • Parwez: 324
  • Arbaz: 504
  • Saif: 609
  • Ekram: 1008
  • Rizwan: 450
  • Mahtab: 456
  • Masood: 325
  • Yusuf: 312
  • Ritesh: 367
  • Aamir: 498

Next Friday on Aug 9, the counts were: Farhan and Wasim joined as from this event

  • Wasaf: 1590
  • Kashif: 1835
  • Barkatullah: 1865
  • Parwez: 1504
  • Arbaz: 2094
  • Saif: 1605
  • Ekram: 1908
  • Rizwan: 1490
  • Mahtab: 1206
  • Masood: 1625
  • Yusuf: 1112
  • Ritesh: 767
  • Aamir: 1498
  • Farhan: 676
  • Wasim: 754

Next Friday on Aug 16, the counts were:

  • Wasaf: 2407
  • Kashif: 2935
  • Barkatullah: 3261
  • Parwez: 3514
  • Arbaz: 3094
  • Saif: 1905
  • Ekram: 4808
  • Rizwan: 2490
  • Mahtab: 3206
  • Masood: 2125
  • Yusuf: 4312
  • Ritesh: 2567
  • Aamir: 3444
  • Farhan: 1835
  • Wasim: 1987

Next Friday on Aug 23, the counts were: This Friday, I was not present, Mahtab took the lead and organized the event.

  • Wasaf: 4432
  • Kashif: 4935
  • Barkatullah: 4261
  • Parwez: 4513
  • Arbaz: 4592
  • Saif: 3400
  • Ekram: 8808
  • Rizwan: 4490
  • Mahtab: 4206
  • Masood: 5124
  • Yusuf: 5213
  • Ritesh: 4765
  • Aamir: 5312
  • Farhan: 3832
  • Wasim: 3943

We skipped next Friday and organized our last event on Saturday, Aug 31, the counts were:

  • Wasaf: 6328
  • Kashif: 6010
  • Barkatullah: 6261
  • Parwez: 5513
  • Arbaz: 6000
  • Saif: 5700
  • Ekram: 12434
  • Rizwan: 6053
  • Mahtab: 4206 (Absent)
  • Masood: 5124 (Absent)
  • Yusuf: 5213 (Absent)
  • Ritesh: 6765
  • Aamir: 6839
  • Farhan: 4791
  • Wasim: 5200

In Total, we have managed to verify 92,437 Audio Clips

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All the Volunteers are continuing this journey and will be taking part in Common Voice Booth at DevFest Ranchi on 22nd September.

Beta Testing BugHunting

Hello Everyone, It’s been almost 9 months since I wrote a blog. There are pending blogs coming soon from Oct 2018, which includes my journey experience and speaking experience from southeast Asia.

After a series of WebExtension events in Ranchi, It was time to test our Favorite browser, we organized two BugHunting events one on 25-May-2019 and next on 09-June-2019.

The first event started with downloading the Firefox Preview after signing and setting up the Google Play account. We have also discussed the importance of Bug and why one should always report.

Mozilla was launching a NEW Android web browser and they needed us to get it ready for the free and open web.

We followed How to Bug Hunt section of https://events.mozilla.org/becomeabetatestingbughunter and Shared the bug entry details

The event concluded with some delicious food at dinner as most of them were keeping Ramadan Fast. So, we preferred the night to do the event.

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The second event had a different goal, we divided the team into two, one who attended previous Bug Hunting Event and the second set of people were new to Bug Hunting.

For newbies were followed the above steps and for ones who attended the previous event, were asked to go through bugs faced by each other and helping others to file the bug they encounter. We have submitted 56 bugs in total using bug entry.

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We concluded the event with awesome food and more bugs!!

Some of the feedback/ bugs we found:

  • It is showing less advertisements
  • It suggest sites automatically( autofill )
  • Multiple tabs works very smoothly
  • Save collection of sites
  • we can blacklist sites
  • we can block microphone while using this browser
  • jharkhand.result.com crashes a lot
  • instagram works smoothly
  • Do not allow to go back from websites such as maps.google.com
  • No Download options
  • Download tracking is not available
  • lags while scrolling to websites like facebook.com
  • Data saving option is not available

Some specific bugs/feedback

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VR and AR on the Web @ Cognizance 2018

Mozilla India’s first collaboration with Cognizance 2k18. Spreading the Mozilla mission in Changa. Also spreading awareness for online privacy, MozActivate campaign. Amongst students from all over Gujarat, in the technical fest hosted by CHARUSAT, Changa. This will be the 1st year when Mozilla India will be present at Cognizance or Changa.

Reps Event Page: https://reps.mozilla.org/e/cognizance-2018/

The event started with the formal introduction of the speakers, Pranshu Khanna and Md. Shahbaz Alam

Event pics: https://photos.app.goo.gl/g68YGybpsALyJyCH9

We were fortunate to have good volunteers with us, who helped as managing this event Pratik, Sumed and Shivam.

Volunteers helping participants with their scenes.

Sharing the best pratices with the students and prize distribution.

 

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Dedication shown by the participants.

 

 

 

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Our Team

 

Public Speaking Advice by Jessica Rose

  • Don’t use Google Slides. Google Slides will always betray you.
  • Try to avoid slides with huge chunks of bullet pointed text. If you are using bullet points, have them reveal as you get to them verbally. People can can read faster can you can speak, they’ll read ahead of you and tune out if your next point is on the slide.
  • Agenda slides are great if you’ve got firm learning outcomes, but consider skipping them if you have limited time or talks that aren’t firmly wedded to a learning outcome.
  • Audience interaction “raise your hand if…” is great, but be flexible and ready to move on if cooperation isn’t forthcoming.
  • BACK EVERYTHING UP! On your device, in the cloud, on a thumb drive. In your format of choice and backup PDF. Your slides will die, your computer will die, you need to be able to plan for all the tech you love betraying you.
  • Videos will fall down, have gifs as a backup or be ready to work without them
  • Live demos are impressive as heck and will fall down all the time. It just happens! Be ready to show a video/gif of a successful demo and practice being jokingly patient around things going wrong when you’re on stage.
  • If you stumble on a pronunciation, word or phrase, don’t go back and rephrase. Just keep going, other folks won’t notice 99% of the time.
  • Unless you’re an old hand with public speaking, you’re probably talking too fast. Slow down, it’ll feel weird but look cool.
  • Speaking to audience who aren’t native speakers of your talk language is such a cool challenge. Slow down, add more text to your slides, cut out idioms and repeat and rephrase things when you get the chance. Clearly communicating to your audience is your job.
  • Have a clear idea of what you want your audience to do. Chat to you afterwards? Follow you on social media? Download the thing you made? Give folks clear, polite, explicit nudges to do the thing.
  • It’s ok to be nervous. But as long as you don’t shake or cry on stage, nobody can tell that you’re nervous. You look cool and in control in stage, it’s all going to be ok!
  • Eventually something scary and bad will go wrong. It’s going to be ok! I’ve no joke fallen off a stage before. As long as you’re physically unharmed, your on stage horror story will eventually become a charming funny story.
  • Q&A can feel scary. But you’re the boss. Most of the audience wants what’s best for you. But you’ve got the upper hand against W&A griefers. If someone starts saying they’ve got a comment, not a question, just say “I want to reserve this time for questions”
  • With video, there’s a lot you can do. If your talk is the worst thing that ever happened to you (it’s probably not!) you can ask they not publish the video. You can also ask for specific simple edits (ex. Don’t show the Q&A plz!)
  • If you can, show up early to the venue to check out the stage, test your kit and pace out the stage. Say hello the the AV folks and crew, they’re here to help make your experience (and video!) great.
  • Advice to find your own presentation style might sound weird to new speakers (how?!) but you’ll find your own style with time. It’s going to be so exciting!
  • Timing is SO HARD. You’ll often run short as a new speaker. Don’t worry about running short. Folks love the chance to grab a coffee or run to the restroom. Practice skipping things in the last part of your talk to adapt for running short on time. Running long is a bit rude.
  • Props. Do you want to use props? Props are hecking great. Audiences love to see physical things. PLEASE show up early and clear props with stage and AV folks. Don’t spring props on them at the last moment.
  • Things going wrong is like a testing process. Everything that falls down, breaks or dies on stage gives you feedback to improve your next talk.
  • If you can, buy a cheap clicker and step away from your computer even if it’s just a bit. It’ll give you a more natural stage presence and prevent you from accidentally pressing the wrong key on your keyboard
  • This is a personal style note: I like to encourage folks to rely on their notes as little as possible. Reading verbatim from your notes will make you sounds stilted and weird.  Practicing with and without notes will teach you to improvise!
  • Public speaking is scary but it can help you gain visibility for your work, make professional connections and establish you as an expert voice in your field.

  • Don’t despair, shy folks! If public speaking isn’t something you want to do, you can gain some of the same benefits through building demos, writing, mentoring or contributing to projects.
  • My super secret practical cheat: Often you can put your own laptop (which you’ve set up to show your next slide, I hope) on the floor in front of you so you can see it for context clues without the audience noticing you look at it.
  • If you want to get invited back to events (or you just want to be nice) thank organizers on the day and send them good follow up feedback.

  • When you can, create a story you can build your talk around. “We built feature X, Y, Z!” vs “Let me tell you about a time I struggled with X. It was hard for [reasons] and it helped us develop X feature. Now doing X is easier because…”

 

LinuxCon China

LinuxCon China was a technical conference for developers, operations experts (architects, sys admins, devops), business, compliance and legal leadership and other professionals to come together in an informal setting to learn from open source experts, have fascinating discussions, collaborate with peers, and gain a competitive advantage with innovative open solutions.

This year I got an opportunity to talk about and represent Auth0 and Mozilla at LinuxCon. It was a 3-day conference where My first talk was based on Serverless where I was representing Auth0 and next day I was representing Mozilla with A-frame and WebVR theme.

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The first day was really amazing as I had to visit all the sponsor’s booth where I got swags and most importantly networking. My talk on Serverless was at 16:20 Chinese Time. It was wonderful to see many attendees waiting for the talk, I started the presentation where I discussed the basics of Client-Server architecture and why we need security layer and how one can get started with serverless. The response of the talk was really good as many came after the session for the get started link and to clear their doubts. It was a good day at the conference.

The second day, I had an open session at the CNCC, where I was given a space where attendees came to interact and know about the project. The project I was having was of A-frame and WebVR. It was really fun to interact with the Chinese attendees as many were unable to understand or speak English, so I had to use VPN to use Google Translate( good translation 🙂 ). Many were excited to know about A-frame since it requires a very little amount of background in computer science to get started. I have shared the links with them via email and wechat. It was a good day to conclude the conference and very happy to represent both Mozilla and Auth0.

Sorry for not taking lot of pics. Thank you and enjoy the panda kickIMG_20180626_121206